Sustainable Asia: October 22-23, 2010

MAR/AAS banner

Sustainable Asia: Challenges and Opportunities
39th Annual Mid-Atlantic Region Association for Asian Studies Conference


Welcome to "Sustainable Asia: Challenges and Opportunities," the 2010 conference of MAR/AAS! The age of localization and globalization compels us to ask and seek answers to the questions of sustainability across many fields. This year's conference features sessions and papers that expand our understanding of related issues, informed by a geographically expansive notion of Asia.

Click here to register for the conference.

Download posters for the MARAAS '10, Teaching Asia Workshop, Shakuhachi Concert, and Woodblock Prints Exhibit.

Campus maps with directions: PDF or viewable online large or small

 

Highlights

Keynote by the Association for Asian Studies President K. Shivi Sivaramakrishnan, Professor of Anthropology, Forestry & environmental Studies, and International & Area Studies, Yale University

Panels (HUB and other venues) and Book Exhibit (Old Botany Building) on a wide range of issues in the politics, economics and cultures of India, East Asia, and Southeast Asia; religious identities; environmental sustainability; politics and education, film, philosophy, media, literature, and more.

Free Flute Concert: Japanese shakuhachi flute concert by Michael Gould and Chieko and Kodi Iwazaki, 5:00 - 6:00 pm, Friday October 22, Schwab Auditorium. Directions to Schwab. Learn more about shakuhachi. Download Poster.

Japanese Woodblock Prints Exhibition, Palmer Museum of Art (Print Study Room, 2nd floor) at Penn State, 10am-4:30pm on Friday and Saturday; free and open to the public. Directions to the Museum. Poster for the Exhibition

Teaching Asia Workshop “Asia and Global Digital Media: 9 am - 4:30 pm Friday October 22 in Lipcon Auditorium at the Palmer Museum. Issues related to globalization and digital media in South and Southeast Asia, East Asia and the Asia Pacific. FREE to first 75 people. ACT 48 certification and credit for 6.5 hours. Click here to register. Directions to the Paterno Library.

Distinguished Asianist Awards: Wayne McWilliams, emeritus professor of history at Towson University. A scholar of Japanese and Chinese history, he served MARAAS as Conference Manager, Vice President, and President.

Posthumous award to late John W. Witek (1933-2010), formerly Professor in the Department of History and Chair of the Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures at Georgetown University. Father Witek served MARAAS as treasurer, Vice President, President, and representative to the national AAS Council of Conferences.

Banquet and Luncheon for registered conference delegates. See the Schedule for times and locations.

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Keynote Speaker


Dr. Kalyanakrishnan (Shivi) Sivaramakrishnan

Dr. Kalyanakrishnan (Shivi) Sivaramakrishnan is the President of the Association for Asian Studies, and Professor of Anthropology; Professor of Forestry & Environmental Studies; Co-Director, Program in Agrarian Studies; and Chair, South Asian Studies Council, Yale University. His research interests span environmental history, political anthropology, cultural geography, development studies, and science studies. He is the author of Modern Forests: Statemaking and Environmental Change in Colonial Eastern India (Stanford UP 1999 & 2002); and the co-editor of Agrarian Environments: Resources, Representations, and Rule in India (Duke UP 2000), Regional Modernities: The Cultural Politics of Development in India (Stanford UP 2003), and Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia (University of Washington Press 2006).

 

Featured Musicians


 

Michael Chikuzen Gould lived in Japan from 1980 to 1997 and became one of only a handful of non-Japanese to hold the title of “Dai Shihan” (Grand Master of Shakuhachi). After returning to the U.S., Chikuzen taught Zen Buddhism and Shakuhachi at the University of Michigan, Oberlin College, and Wittenberg University. He has presented over 500 solo concerts and has also played with the Taiko drumming groups, Chinese harp and pipe organ. He appeared in the world premiere of the opera “Madame Butterfly” using Japanese instruments, performed Karl Jenkins’ “Requiem” with the Metropolitan Detroit Chorale.

Chieko and Kodi Iwazaki

Chieko is a native of Japan and an ardent student of the koto. Due to corporate commitments, she found herself living in the States for the past few years. The koto produces one of the most relaxing forms of music. My husband Kodi joins us on many songs by playing his Shakuhachi. He has been playing for most of his life, and greatly enjoyes the experience. The Shakuhachi and the koto work very well together and both instruments compliment each other. Careful listening will denote the equality of both instruments. Neither instrument assumes leadership nor is subordinate to the other. Like an ideal real life relationship, the team is composed of equals.

 

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Schedule (subject to change)


 

Download posters for the MARAAS '10, Teaching Asia Workshop, and Shakuhachi Concert

Campus map with directions: PDF or viewable online large or small

Finalized conference program.

Overview

 

Friday, October 22

8:00-5:00            Registration for Teaching Asia Workshop and for MARAAS conference, HUB 106
      
9:00-4:30            Teaching Asia Workshop: Asia and Global Digital Media, Lipcon Auditorium

10:00-4:30           Woodblock Prints Exhibition, Palmer Museum Print Study Room (2nd floor) - poster

1:00-3:00 p.m.     MARAAS board meeting, Weaver 102, History Conference Room

3:15-4:45 p.m.     MARAAS session I (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Burrowes & Weaver

5:00-6:00 p.m.     Shakuhachi Flute Concert, Schwab Auditorium. Directions to Schwab. Learn more about shakuhachi.

6:30-8:00 p.m.     Annual Banquet and AAS Presidential Address, University Club

Saturday, October 23

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.     Registration for MARAAS conference in HUB 106

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.     Book Exhibit in Old Botany Building, Asian Studies Conference Room

8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.   Session II (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Burrowes, Sparks & Weaver

10:00-4:30                 Woodblock Prints Exhibition, Palmer Museum Print Study Room (2nd floor)

10:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Session III (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Sparks, Burrowes & Weaver

12:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m.   Luncheon and Annual Business Meeting, Nittany Lion Inn

2:00 pm.-3:30 p.m.     Session IV (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Burrowes & Weaver

3:45 p.m.-5:15 p.m.    Session V(parallel sessions) in the HUB, Sparks, Burrowes & Weaver
                                        

Sunday, October 24

Departures

 

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Detailed Schedule

Teaching Asia Workshop: Asia and Global Digital Media

 

Provides training of and exposure to contemporary and historical issues related to globalization and digital media in South and Southeast Asia, East Asia and the Asia Pacific.

FREE to first 75 people and travel support up to; ACT 48 certification and credit available for 6.5 hours. Click here to register.

Download the flyer for the Teaching Asia Workshop

 

Highlights

• Japanese woodblock prints exhibition, Palmer Museum of Art Print Study Room (participants will also be able to study the prints close up during the workshop). Museum hours 10:00-4:30 Friday and Saturday (http://www.palmermuseum.psu.edu/)

• Complimentary tickets to an evening performance of Japanese shakuhachi flute

• Lunch will be provided

• Course materials

• Free registration to the MAR/AAS Annual Conference (Oct. 22-23)

• One year’s membership in MAR/AAS

Topics

• Incorporation of contemporary and traditional Asian cultures into the curriculum

• Design Web-based assignments including wiki tools and student blogs

• Promote cognition and student-centered, Web-based learning

• Expand educational boundaries through multi-school collaboration

• Adapt e-learning to different learning styles

Friday, October 22

 

8:00-9:00        Registration, HUB 106.

9-9:10 am       Welcome and Introduction: Teaching Asia in the Global Digital Age
                    Dr. Alex Huang (Penn State), Lipcon Auditorium

9:10-10:00 am Japanese Pop Culture, Print Culture and Digital Media, Lipcon Auditorium
                    Dr. Jonathan Abel and Dr. Charlotte Eubanks (Penn State)

Participants will be able to avail themselves of the Japanese Woodblock Prints Exhibit at the Palmer Museum on campus curated by Prof. Charlotte Eubanks

10:00-10:15 am Coffee Break in Old Botany Building

10:15-11:00 am Traditional Asian Music in the Classroom, Lipcon Auditorium
                    Michael Gould, shakuhachi bamboo flute musician

11:00 am-11:50 am South Asian City and Architecture, Lipcon Auditorium
                    Dr. Madhuri Desai (Penn Sate)

11:50 am – 1:00 pm Lunch Break (Old Botany Building, Asian Studies)

1:00-1:50 pm Teaching Cultural History in Language Courses, Lipcon Auditorium
                 Dr. Nick Kaldis and Shu-min Tung (Binghamton University-SUNY)

1:50-2:00 pm Coffee Break in Old Botany Building

2:00-2:50 pm Educational Technologies for Learning Communities, Lipcon Auditorium
                    Dr. Wen-hua Du, Dr. Meredith Doran and Dr. Kyle Peck (Penn State)

2:50-3:10 pm Evaluation and Discussion, Lipcon Auditorium

3:30-4:30      Woodblock Print Exhibition at Palmer Museum of Art, 2nd floor Print Study Room; directions to the Museum. Poster for the Exhibition

5:00 -6:00     Cultural Event: shakuhachi Japanese bamboo flute concert, Schwab Auditorium
Download the poster for the Shakuhachi Concert; Directions to Schwab. Learn more about shakuhachi.

Map and Locations

Campus map with directions: PDF or viewable online large or small

Liberal Arts buildings Campus map

See pictures and details of each location: the HUB, the Paterno Lirary, Old Botany, Palmer Museum of Art, and Schwab Auditorium.

Please note that the workshop is held in a cluster of buildings in close proximity to one another, though the Lipcon Audtiorium will be the primary venue: registration in the HUB, workshop sesssions in the Lipcon Audtorium, and lunch in the Old Botany Building. The exhibition is on view throughout the conference at the Palmer Museum of Art.

Cost

The Workshop is subsidized by the Association of Asian Studies (AAS), Penn State’s Asian Studies Program, and the MAR/AAS. It will be FREE to first 75 people; ACT 48 certification and credit available for 6.5 hours. Participants will receive—in addition to the presentations—course materials, lunch, free registration to the MAR/AAS Annual Conference to be held October 22-23, and one year’s membership in MAR/AAS.

Click here to register.

Speakers

Jonthan Abel is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, Japanese, and Asian Studies Program at Penn State.

Madhuri Desai is Assistant Professor in the Department of Art History and Asian Studies Program at Penn State.

Meredith Doran is Assistant Professor of French and Applied Linguistics at Penn State.

Wen-hua Du is the coordinator of Chinese program and Senior Lecturer in Chinese at Penn State University.

Charlotte Eubanks is Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature, Japanese, and Asian Studies at Penn State.

Nick Kaldis is Director of Chinese Studies and Associate Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian & Asian-American Studies at Binghamton University (S.U.N.Y.).

Kyle L. Peck is Associate Dean for Outreach, Technology, and International Programs, and Professor of Education at Penn State University.

Shu-min Tung is a Lecturer in the Chinese Studies Program in the Department of Asian & Asian American Studies at Binghamton University (SUNY).

 

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Detailed Schedule

The 39th Annual MARAAS Conference

Download the posters for the MARAAS '10, Woodblock Prints Exhibit, and the Shakuhachi Concert

Campus map with directions: PDF or viewable online large or small

See pictures and details of each location: the HUB, Weaver, Burrowes, Sparks, the Lipcon Audtorium in the Palmer Museum, Old Botany, Palmer Museum of Art, and Schwab Auditorium.

More information: registration, directions, accommodation, finalized conference program.

 

Friday, October 22

8:00-5:00            Registration, HUB 106

10:00-4:30           Japanese Woodblock Prints Exhibition, Palmer Museum of Art, Print Study Room (2nd floor); directions to the Museum

1:00-3:00 p.m.     MARAAS board meeting, Weaver 102, History Conference Room; see online map for directions

3:15-4:45 p.m.     MARAAS session I (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Paterno Library, Burrowes & Weaver

Historical and Contemporary Buddhism (Paterno 403)
Chair: Charlotte Eubanks, Pennsylvania State University
Reappearing Amitabha Buddha in the 21st century with a scientific face, B. Hyun Choo, SUNY Stony Brook
Reading by Heart: Translated Buddhism and the Pictorial Heart Sutras of Early Modern Japan, Charlotte Eubanks, Pennsylvania State University
Japanese Buddhist Precepts in 1938-1939: Non-Precept vs. Precept Revival Movements, Shigeru Osuka, Seton Hall University

Environmental and Economic Sustainability in Asia (HUB 208)
Chair: A. Maria Toyoda, Villanova University
Economic and Environmental Sustainability of Wind Power: A Study of India, B.P. Chandramohan and T.K.S. Villalan, Presidency College
Sustainable Development of Mosuo Eco-Cultural Tourism in China: Challenges and Opportunities, Gang Chen, Yunnan University of Finance and Economics
Mapping the Hazy Territory: Beijing’s Controversial Air Quality Monitoring Programs, Janice Hua Xu, Cabrini College

Politics, Education, and Sustainability in Contemporary South Asia (HUB 107)
Chair: Siddharth Chandra, Michigan State University
Can the Type of Political Regime Explain Educational Development? A Case Study on Pakistan, Wajeeha Bajwa, The Center for Research on Economic and Social Transformation, Islamabad
The Pakistan Factor in America’s War on Terror, Ayesha Ray, King’s College, Pennsylvania
Sustainable Afghanistan: The Counterinsurgency’s Challenges and Opportunities, Mark Silinsky, Tulane University

Civil Society, Democracy, and War (HUB 235)
Chair: Dennis Hart, University of Pittsburgh
Evolution and Dynamism of State, Market and Civil Society in the Korean Peninsula: Focusing On the Unification and Inter-Korean Relations Area, Bokgyo Jeong, University of Pittsburgh
The Changes of Historical Appraisal Regarding the Korean War and General MacArthur in Korea: 1950-2010, Borim Kim, Chongshin University
Thailand: An On-Going Struggle for Democracy, Culver S. Ladd, Payap University
Dealing with the Legacy of the Afghan Jihad – Is there a Need for a Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Isaac Kfir, Syracuse University

Sustainable Identities: Nationalism and Transnationalism (Burrowes 430)
Chair: David Kenley, Elizabethtown College
Globalization and the Denationalizion of the Indian Middle Class, Rajesh Kochhar, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali
The Peranakan Chinese of Indonesia: Language and Identity, Eddie McGee, Ohio University
Post-colonizing Hospitality: Cycling the Returning Transnational Migrant Guest in a Global Context, Malasree Neepa Acharya, Institute for European Studies
Nation’s Pride in the Age of Globalization: Rethink the way nation’s pride should be taken in China, Qian Xie, Seton Hall University

Visual and Performance Art in East Asia (HUB 233)
Chair: Cecilia L. Chien, West Chester University
Sustaining a Viewership: Chinese Television, Historical Drama, and National Identity, Cecilia L. Chien, West Chester University
Their Own Kingdom, Their Own Nation Building-Gendered Nationalism of the Korean Historical Drama, Jumong, Young A Jung, George Mason University
Korean Portrait Painting during the Choson Dynasty (1392-1910), Hwa Young Caruso, Molloy College, NY
Sustaining Tradition: Landscape Paintings of Chang Ku-nien (1906–1987) in Postwar Taiwan, Wen-chien Cheng, University of Michigan

The Making of Modern Japan (Weaver 102)
Chair: Frank L. Chance, University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Hepburn’s Contributions to Japan, Hideo Watanabe, William Paterson University
Between Banality and Apathy: A Study of Japanese Nationalism, Kazuya Fukuoka, Saint Joseph’s University
The Making of the Japanese Woman: Women, Civilization, and Wars, Masako Endo, State University of New York-Binghamton
Sustaining the Japanese Household: Kitchen Politics in Early Post World War II Japan, 1945-52, Marlene J. Mayo, University of Maryland


5:00-6:00 p.m.     Shakuhachi Flute Concert, Schwab Auditorium; Directions to Schwab. Learn more about shakuhachi.

6:30-8:00 p.m.     Annual Banquet and AAS Presidential Address, University Club

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Saturday, October 23

 

Campus map with directions: PDF or view online

See pictures and details of each location: the HUB, Weaver, Burrowes, Sparks, Old Botany, and the Palmer Museum of Art.

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.     Registration for MARAAS conference in HUB 106(map)

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.     Book Exhibit in Old Botany Bldg, Asian Studies Conference Room (map)

8:30 a.m.-10:00 a.m.   Session II (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Sparks, Burrowes & Weaver

India in the Global Age (Paterno 403)
Chair: Valerian DeSousa, West Chester University
The Decay of Traditional Fishing in Goa, Hubert Spangler, West Chester University
Effective HIV prevention messages in the MSM Community in New Delhi: A Case Study, Madeline Munitz, West Chester University
Modern Indian Conflict: The Case of the Narmada Dam, Kris Jackson, West Chester University
Social and Cultural Context of Consumerism: Marketing Barbie in India, Janice Reese, West Chester University

Philosophy and Morality in Classical Chinese Thinking (HUB 107)
Chair: On-cho Ng, Pennsylvania State University
Discussant, On-cho Ng, Pennsylvania State University
Chinese Genesis Stories and the Self in Ancient China, Erica Brindley, Pennsylvania State University
Connections between History and Philosophy: Interpretations of the “Kun” Hexagram, Dennis C. H. Cheng, National Taiwan University / Leiden University
The Ethics of Genuineness (zhen) in Classical Daoism, Tao Jiang, Rutgers University
The Logic in Chinese Thinking, Chung-yue Chang, Montclair State University

The Media of Suppression: Censorship and the Circulation of Cultural Material in Modern Japan (HUB 208)
Chair: Jonathan Abel, Pennsylvania State University
Censors as Producers, Jonathan Abel, Pennsylvania State University
Banished, burned and bowdlerized: banned books in Japanese libraries, Sharon Domier, University of Massachusetts Amherst
The Censor as a Music Critic: Consuming and Censoring Popular Songs in Imperial Japan, Hiromu Nagahara, Harvard University

Class, Gender, and Working Mothers in Japan (HUB 233)
Chair: Susan Holloway, University of California, Berkeley
Mothers and Labor Force Participation in Contemporary Japan: Partial Resistance to Powerful Barriers, Susan Holloway, University of California, Berkeley
Negotiating Class-Related Beliefs in Japan: Working Class Mothers’ Involvement in Children’s Education, Yoko Yamamoto, Brown University
The Factors Contributing to Uneven Distribution of Medical Specialization by Gender: Analysis of Interview Data with Female Medical Doctors in Japan, Mayumi Nakamura, University of Toyama
Divorce in Family Lives, Allison Alexey, Lafayette College

Cultural Agendas in Late Colonial India (HUB 235)
Chair: Madhuri Desai, Pennsylvania State University
‘The Peoples’ Language’: Literature, Language & Cultural Hierarchies in Bengal: Early Modern & Modern Periods, Kumkum Chatterjee, Pennsylvania State University
Multiple Layers of Bihari Identity, Aryendra Chakravartty, Pennsylvania State University
Aestheticizing Labor? An Affective Discourse of Cooking in Colonial Bengal, Utsa Ray, Independent Scholar
Discussant: Eric Hayot, Pennsylvania State University

Illusions of Sustainability in Contemporary Taiwan: From Environmental Imagination to New Technologies and Designs (Burrowes 430)
Chair: Shuang Shen, Pennsylvania State University
A Sustainable Landscape with Fengshui? - Contemporary Taiwanese Fengshui Discourse with Environmentalism, Shih-Hsiang Sung, University of Pittsburgh
Design with Bamboo: Rediscovering a Taiwanese Sustainable Material, Chih-I Lai, University College London
Good Science but Bad Business? An Experimental Biofuel Project and the Imagination on Environmental and Agricultural Boundaries, Yi-Tze Lee, University of Pittsburgh

India and the Neighborhood: Pedagogy of Teaching across Borders
(Weaver 102)
Chair: Diane Freedman, Community College of Philadelphia
Teaching Globalization through Archives: Evidence from the Jewish Genizah of Cairo on 12th century Trade with India, Diane Freedman, Community College of Philadelphia
Teaching Comparative Philosophy of Religion: Philosophia and Darsana, David Prejsnar, Community College of Philadelphia

Nations, Languages, and Identities (Sparks 124)
Chair: Young Rae Oum, University of Pittsburgh
Rice Kings and Potato Queens: Race, Language and Identity in Korean America, Young Rae Oum, University of Pittsburgh
Chinese-American Nationality and Heritage Language Maintenance, Kristopher Geda, University of Pittsburgh
The Limits of Imagined Communities: The Role of Religion and Language in the Creation of Bangladesh, 1919-1971, Jennifer Murawski, University of Pittsburgh


10:00-4:30                 Japanese Woodblock Prints Exhibition, Palmer Museum of Art, Print Study Room (2nd floor); directions to the Museum

10:15 a.m.-11:45 a.m. Session III (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Paterno Library, Sparks, Burrowes & Weaver

Cross-Cultural Education in Digital Natives (HUB 208)
Chair: Hsiao-Hui Yang, Pennsylvania State University
Difference of Figured World Formation in World of Warcraft: Understanding Digital Cross Cultural Difference and Possibilities in Culture Education, YunJoon “Jason” Lee, Pennsylvania State University
Identity Options for Cultural Education in Korea: Comparing with U.S Movies and Korean English Textbooks, Yunjeong Chung, Pennsylvania State University
Sunzi’s War Rhetoric in Chinese Kungfu Movies: Cross-Cultural Education through The Forbidden Kingdom, Hsiao-Hui Yang, Pennsylvania State University
Discussant, On-cho Ng, Pennsylvania State University

Sustainability Lessons from Medieval Asia (HUB 233)
Chair: Martie Geiger-Ho, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
Beyond Cultural Challenge: Sustainable Influence of Chinese Buddhist Artifacts, Kong Ho, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford
Early Medieval Urban Centers in the Godavari basin (600 C.E-1300 C.E): Sustainability and Growth, Lavanya Vemsani, Shawnee State University
China from the South China Sea: Collecting and Recontextualizing Ancient and Modern Ceramic Shards from Hong Kong's Diverse Shorelines, Martie Geiger-Ho, University of Pittsburgh at Bradford

Japanese Literature Studies (HUB 235)
Chair: Masako Nakagawa, Villanova University
The Shishi-no-tani Conspiracy Sequence in the Heike Monogatari: Ritual in Text and Text as Ritual, Frank William Clements, University of Pennsylvania
Yu Dafu and Kasai Zenzou’s Literary Works, Hailin Zhou, Villanova University
Life of Kawasaki Chotaro: The View from His Humble Abode, Masako Nakagawa, Villanova University
Heterogeneity in Contemporary Japanese Literature, Reiko Tachibana,

Sustaining Foreign Language Training (Burrowes 430)
Chair: Mahua Bhattacharya, Elizabethtown College
A Case Study of Introducing Chinese Language Teaching to an American College Community, Jinai Sun, Pennsylvania State University
Training Participant Observers: Making Orientalism Work for You, Mahua Bhattacharya, Elizabethtown College
Translation as a Teaching Tool in Chinese Language Teaching, Peijie Cai, Binghamton University
Parents’ perceptions of using mass media as English language learning materials in Korea, Su Young Kang, Pennsylvania State University

Illusion, Reality, Interpretation (Weaver 102)
Chair: Gregory Smits, Pennsylvania State University
Was China’s Cultural Revolution a Liminal Stage that Failed?, John Knight, Ohio State University
Illusion, Reality, and the Feminine Ideal in Miike Takashi’s Audition, Kathryn Hemmann, University of Pennsylvania
Staging “(Free) Love”: —Making and Owning Amateur Drama in Beijing in 1922, Man He, Ohio State University
Mirror Images: Tōhokugaku as Nihonjinron?, Nathan Hopson, University of Pennsylvania

War and Justice in Japan (Paterno 403)
Chair: Frank Chance, University of Pennsylvania
The Hiatus of Lay Participation in Criminal Jury Trials in Japan: 1943-2009, Jesse J. Rosso, Seton Hall University
Anti-nuclear Norms in Japan, Shigehiro Suzuki, Drexel University
The Erosion of the Peace Article: Japan’s Role in Iraq, Trevor Swan, Seton Hall University

New Approaches to Tokugawa History: Women and Ethnic Minorities (HUB 107)
Chair: Todd Munson, Randolph-Macon College
Reputation and Recognition in Seventeenth-Century Japanese Domain Politics: The Case of Wakita Kyūbei and his Military Service during the Osaka Campaigns, David Nelson, Austin Peay State University
Education as a Mechanism of Status Enhancement in Early Modern Japan, Charles Andrews, Randolph-Macon College
The Chinese Diaspora in Bakumatsu Japan, Todd Munson, Randolph-Macon College

The Sustaining Role of Literature in East Asia (Sparks 124)
Chair: Jonathan Abel, Pennsylvania State University
Towards an Ecology of Mind: Murakami Haruki and Bob Dylan, Thomas O. Beebee and Yuka Amano, Pennsylvania State University
Li Bai and Tang cosmopolitanism, Xin Wei, Pennsylvania State University
Reading as Ritual Experience: Izumi Kyōka’s Grass Labyrinth, Yuka Amano, Pennsylvania State University
Neurotic Mothering in Contemporary Japanese Literature: Asahina Asuka’s “The Small Shell [Chiisana Koura]”, Kyoko Taniguchi, Dickinson College


12:00 p.m.-1:45 p.m.   Luncheon and Annual Business Meeting, Nittany Lion Inn(map)

 

2:00 pm.-3:30 p.m.     Session IV (parallel sessions) in the HUB, Paterno Library, Burrowes & Weaver

The Role of Civil Society in Relation to the State in Korea (Paterno 403)
Chair: Jiso Yoon, Pennsylvania State University
The State and Civil Society Revisited: The Case of Korea, Jiso Yoon, Pennsylvania State University
Scientific Knowledge and Politics of Uncertainty: Politics of the Mad Cow Mobilization and the River Restoration Project in South Korea, Jonghwa Kwon, Binghamton University (SUNY)
Discussant, Young Hun Kim, East Carolina University

Political, Social, and Resource Sustainability in Postwar Japan
(HUB 107)
Chair: Jessamyn Abel, Pennsylvania State University
“Cleaning Up the Environment”: Sustaining Base Town Japan (1951-1960), Holly Sanders, Villanova University
Sustaining Ties through Unsustainable Resources: Oil and the Postwar Japanese-Indonesian Relationship, Eric G. Dinmore, Hampden-Sydney College
A Sustainable Role for Postwar Japan: The 1955 Bandung Conference, Jessamyn Abel, Pennsylvania State University

Working towards a Learner-Centered Approach in Language Education: Theory and Practice (HUB 235)
Chair: Tomoko Takami, University of Pennsylvania
Learner-Centered Approach in Japanese for Professional Purposes, Tomoko Takami, University of Pennsylvania
Learner-Centered Teaching in Introductory Language Course: Experiential Reflection on Practice and Implications, Takaaki Kizu, University of Pennsylvania
Student Learning Through Interaction, Ruri Hirayama, University of Pennsylvania
Discussant: Midori Yonezawa Morris, University of Pennsylvania

Reimagining the Past for the Present: Issues of Reworking, Iconicity, and Visuality in Early Modern Japan (HUB 233)
Chair: Julie Nelson Davis, University of Pennsylvania
Switching Media: A Reworking of the Thirty-Six Poets Iconography in a Seventeenth-Century Screen, Tomoko Sakomura, Swarthmore College
Pleasure and Parody in Edo: Suzuki Harunobu’s Zashiki Hakkei, Jeannie Kenmotsu, University of Pennsylvania
Ichikawa Danjûrô and the Ema Paintings of Naritasan, Hilary K. Snow, Loyola University Maryland
The Working Image: Exploring Hara Yoyusai’s Sketchbooks and Lacquers, Robert Mintz, The Walters Art Museum

Sameness or Equality: Gender Discourses during China's Cultural Revolution (Burrowes 430)
Chair: Yuping Zhang, Lehigh University
Net Wars: The government versus the people: Online in the People's Republic, John Jirik, Lehigh University
A Place where Women are Like Tigers and Men are Like Cats: Engendering Modernity in Contemporary China, Vera Fennel, Lehigh University
Sameness or Equality: Gender Discourses During China’s Cultural Revolution, Yuping Zhang, Lehigh University

Asian Comparative Philosophy (Weaver 102)
Chair: Thomas Radice, Southern Connecticut State University
Buddhist Ethics, Frank Hoffman, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Asian Thought and Sustainable Development, Tim Burke, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
The Nonduality of the Middle Path, Dan Herr, West Chester University of Pennsylvania
Discussant: Harvey Greer, West Chester University of Pennsylvania

Politics and the Public in Contemporary China (HUB 208)
Chair: Zhiqun Zhu, Bucknell University
China’s Accession to WTO-The Analysis based on Power Transition Theory, Sookyung Koo, Georgetown University
China and the U.S.: A Culture of Communication Conundrums, Wil Brander, Pennsylvania State University, York
Why Chinese Intellectuals Lose Their Influence upon the General Public since the 1990s, Zhansui Yu, Lehigh University


3:45 p.m.-5:15 p.m.    Session V(parallel sessions) in the HUB, Paterno Library, Sparks, Burrowes & Weaver

The Challenges of Environmental Sustainability in India (HUB 208)
Chair: Tapati Mukhopadhyay, India Siddharth College of Arts, Science and Commerce
Sustainability of Small/Medium Towns in Mumbai Metropolitan Region, India. (Case Study of Bhiwandi and Kalyan), Baishakhi Dutta, University of Mumbai
Urbanisation and Environmental Degradation: A case study of “Queen of Hills” Darjeeling, Moushumi Datta, University of Mumbai
Challenges of Development of Sindhudurg: a Backward Coastal District of Western India near Mumbai Metro City, Mousumi Mazumdar and Tapati Mukhopadhyay, India Siddharth College of Arts, Science and Commerce
Analysis of Variations in Temperature and Rainfall of Metro Region: A Case Study of Mumbai, University of Mumbai, Sunita Maral, University of Mumbai
Sustainability of Urban Development in South Asia: A Case study of Dhaka and Mumbai, Tapati Mukhopadhyay, University of Mumbai

Genocide, Control, and Disenfranchisement (HUB 235)
Chair: Charles Desnoyers, La Salle University
The Killing Fields of Jiangnan: Expanding the Historical Chronology of Genocide Through a Memoir of the Taiping Rebellion, Charles Desnoyers, La Salle University
Through a Glass Darkly: Christianity and the Politics of Control in Tokugawa Japan, Michael Laver, Rochester Institute of Technology
Bringing the Ainu Back to the Political Fold: Political Disenfranchisement and Shifting Activism of the Ainu, Sevan Simon, Seton Hall University

Sustainable Development: Agriculture, Tourism, and the Role of the State (Burrowes 430)
Chair: Cecilia L. Chien, West Chester University
Indonesian Rice Farmers and the Moroccan Royal Family: Connecting Local to Global in Agricultural Social Movements, Rebakah Daro Minarchek, Cornell University
China’s Regional Development Programs: Sustainable Development or “Pork Barrel” Politics?, Gary Andrasko, Seton Hall University
Coastal Tourism Development and Sustainability Practices in Sihanoukville, Cambodia, Jackie Lei Tin Ong, The University of Queensland

Finding Meaning: Spirituality and Sustainability (HUB 107)
Chair: Erica Brindley, Pennsylvania State University
What Has Greater Value Than Money?, James Stiles, West Chester University
Zhu Xi on Ethical Criticism of Art, Suk Choi, Towson University

Gender and Politics (Paterno Library)
Chair: Marlene J. Mayo, University of Maryland
Gendered Space in Text and Ritual: Deconstructing a Popular Women’s Tradition in Nepal, Jessica Vantine Birkenholtz, University of Chicago
Gendering Sensation in Shi Zhecun’s “Kumarajiva”, Madeleine Wilcox, University of Pennsylvania
Sustaining the Japanese Household: Kitchen Politics and Food Management in Allied Occupied Japan, 1945-52, Marlene J. Mayo, University of Maryland
The Poetics and Politics of Brothel Raiding: Sustainable NGO-Red Light Community Relations and Feminism(s) in Contemporary India, Megan Hamm, University of Pittsburgh

Sustainable Economic and Technological Development (HUB 233)
Chair: A. Maria Toyoda, Villanova University
Japan’s Eco-Diplomacy: The Politics of Economic Cooperation, A. Maria Toyoda, Villanova University
Role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in Poverty Alleviation in India, Alok Sharma, Jagan Nath University, Jaipur
Use of Information and Communication Technologies for Bridging the Digital Divide in rural areas, Deepak Kapoor, Indian Institute of Information Technology
The Role of Chinese NGOs in Promoting Effective Green Governance and Sustainable Development, Simona Alba Grano, Institute of East Asian Studies, Zürich University, Switzerland

Race, Class, and Immigration (Weaver 102)
Chair: Diditi Mitra, Brookdale Community College
Race, Class and American Immigration Laws: The impact on Punjabi immigrants, Diditi Mitra, Brookdale Community College
Migration and Adaptation: The Indian Community in Lisbon, Valerian DeSousa, West Chester University
Determinants of Migration in the Philippines: A Socio-Economic Analysis of the Decision to Migrate Among the Alumni of San Pablo Diocesan Seminary, Vincent Villanueva, Asian Social Institute

Literature and Poetry in China, Taiwan (Sparks 124)
Chair: Charlotte Eubanks, Pennsylvania State University
Animal Spirits, Wolf Totems, and China’s Race for Sustainability, Andrea Bachner, Ohio State University
Turning Homes into Factories, Grace Hui-chuan Wu, Pennsylvania State University
Writing and Immortality in Su Shi’s Rhapsodies on Red Cliff, Jeffrey Rice, University of Pennsylvania

 

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Registration


 

Take advantage of the early bird and/or MARAAS member discounts. Click here to register for the conference. Questions? Email asianstudies@psu.edu or call +1.814.867.3260

You may also register on site in the HUB (map).

Click here to view the current MARAAS Newsletter.

Download posters for the MARAAS '10, Teaching Asia Workshop, Woodblock Prints Exhibition, and Shakuhachi Concert

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Directions & Maps


Campus map with directions to conference venues and parking decks: PDF or view online. Downalod Penn State Visitor's Guide.

All talks and events are free and open to the public, and will be held in a cluster of buildings in close proximity to one another, including the HUB, Old Botany Building, Weaver, Paterno Library 403, Sparks, Burrowes, Schwab Auditorium, and the Palmer Museum of Art.

Here is a smaller map showing only the conference venues and Nittany Lion Inn on campus. Penn State University’s University Park campus is 10 minutes to the University Park (State College) airport and 40 minutes away from the Amtrak station in Lewistown, PA, where daily trains are available to major cities throughout the mid-Atlantic area. Greyhound services are also available with a bus station directly across from our campus (see below).

By Car

Download driving directions (PDF). The Campus is located within driving distance of many major cities including Harrisburg (1.5 hrs., 90 mi), Pittsburgh (3 hrs., 137 mi), Philadelphia (3.5 hrs., 194 mi), Baltimore (3.5 hrs., 155 mi), Washington D.C. (4 hrs., 190 mi), New York City (5 hrs., 250 mi) and Toronto (6.5 hrs., 304 mi).

From New York City, the suggested route is via the George Washington Bridge to I-80. In Pennsylvania, exit I- 80 at exit 161 (Bellefonte) and follow PA Route 220 south to State College. Take exit 74 for Innovation Park/Penn State University.

From the Philadelphia area, take Philadelphia Schuylkill Expressway to the Pennsylvania Turnpike, leave the Turnpike at exit 247 (Harrisburg East), and follow I-283 to I-83 and proceed north on I-83 to the I-81 interchange. Then follow I-81 south to Route 322, 22 West exit. Proceed west on Route 322 through Lewistown to State College exit #74.

From Pittsburgh, follow Route 22 East to Duncansville, I-99/Route 220 North to Route 322 East to Mt. Nittany Expressway/State College exit #73,

OR

Follow Route 22 East beyond Duncansville to Water Street, Route 45 East to Pine Grove Mills and Route 26 North to State College.

From the west, take I-80 to exit 123 (Woodland) just east of Clearfield, then US Route 322 east to State College, or exit I-80 at exit 161 (Bellefonte) and follow PA Route 220 south to State College.

From Washington, D.C., take Route 270 to Frederick then Route 70 to Breezewood - PA turnpike (exit 12) - and go one exit West to Bedford (exit 11); Take I-99 north to Route 220 to Route 322 East to State College exit #74,

OR

take I-95 or the Baltimore-Washington Parkway to Baltimore, west loop I-695 to I-83 north. Continue on I- 83 north to the I-81 interchange. Then follow I-81 south to Route 322, 22 exit. Proceed west on Route 322 to Lewistown and State College.

By Bus

Fullington Trailways (814-238-1100) and Greyhound Lines (814-238-7971) connections are available to and from State College. The Bus Terminal is located at 152 N Atherton St.

By Air

Delta Connection, Northwest Airlink, United Express and US Airways Express serve the State College area through the University Park Airport (SCE), located five miles from campus. Rental car, limousine, and taxi service is available. For reservations and information: Delta 1-800-221-1212; Northwest Airlink 1-800-225-2525; United Express 1-800-241-6522; US Airways Express 1-800-428-4322. Private or charter aircraft may fly into University Park Airport. Please call (814) 865-5511 to make arrangements.

Located 90 miles southeast of State College, Harrisburg International Airport offers an alternative arrival and departure location. Airlines serving Harrisburg include Air Canada, American Eagle, Continental, Delta, Northwest, United, and US Airways. Rental car service is available.

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Parking


 

Download the campus map with directions to conference venues and parking decks: PDF or viewable online large or small. Conference delegates staying at the Nittany Lion Inn receive free parking at the Nittany Parking Deck on campus. Others can also park at the Nittany Parking Deck and pay hourly or daily rates. Another choice is the HUB Parking Deck (next to the HUB, one of the main conference venues).

If you are staying at a downtown hotel, you can walk to campus and take advantage of the free parking offered by your hotel.

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Lodging


Download the campus map showing the two conference hotels: PDF or viewable online large or small.

The two conference hotels are the Nittany Lion Inn (on campus; walk to conference venues) and Penn Stater Hotel (5 minutes by free shuttle to the conference venues on campus).

PLEASE NOTE: You must call the hotel and use the booking code MARE10A (which does not work online) to get the discounted rate. The discounted rate with tax is $ 129.12 per night at both hotels.

There are plenty of other hotels in town, including several that are within walking distance to the campus:

Best Western University Park Inn & Suites ($ 84, free parking, and shuttle to/from campus)
115 Premiere Drive
State College, PA 16801
PH-814-234-8393
Fax-814-234-8397
Please use booking rate: Asian Studies Conference when calling to reserve your room.
bwupsales@nittanyhotel.com

Atherton Hotel
125 South Atherton Street
State College, PA 16801For reservations and sales:
800-832-0132 or 814-231-2100

Days Inn State College
240 South Pugh Street
State College, PA 16801 USMaps & Directions Maps & DirectionsHotel's Sunburst RatingPhone:
814-238-8454

Visit http://www.visitpennstate.org/visitors/ for more lodging options.

For maps, directions, and other information for visitors, see the Penn State Visitors' Guide. For other conference details, please contact Rowan Cota.

 

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Acknowledgements


 

From the MARAAS

The Mid-Atlantic Region Association for Asian Studies thanks Penn State University for hosting this year's conference and Rowan Cota of Asian Studies Program. She has been indispensable. Thanks go also to Dr. David Kenley, this year's Program Chair, for assembling a diverse and captivating program, and Dr. Alexander Huang who is Conference Manager. We extend a very big thank you to the many faculty, staff and students at Penn State who have tirelessly worked to make this event possible and the community groups and individuals who have contributed to make this a memorable event, including Dr. Eric Hayot (Director of Asian Studies), Dr. Charlotte Eubanks, Dr. Jonathan Abel, and Dr. Shuang Shen. Penn State Asian Studies Program, Schwab Auditorium, and Palmer Museum of Art.

 

From the Penn State University

Dear MAR/AAS 2010 conference participants:

It is my pleasure to welcome you to Penn State University! I am delighted that Penn State is acting as host to Asianists from the Mid-Atlantic and elsewhere around the globe, and look forward to the events that will unfold over the conference weekend, including the shakuhachi flute concert, Japanese woodblock print exhibit, and Teaching Asia Workshop. While you are here, I encourage you to explore our campus, speak with members of our community, and learn more about the University and its Asian Studies Program. Our faculty have research and teaching interests in a wide variety of Asian Studies fields and span a number of different departments. Together with our expansive network of alumni, faculty, students, donors, collaborative projects, and education abroad programs, our faculty are helping us prepare the next generation of leaders and scholars in Asian Studies fields. We are especially excited about our new dual-title PhD programs in Applied Linguistics and Asian Studies, Comparative Literature and Asian Studies, History and Asian Studies, and Political Science and Asian Studies, which combine area research with traditional disciplinary training. Students in the new dual-title programs receive fellowships and teaching assistantships, and are eligible for summer scholarships and other forms of research support. If you have students you think might do well here, please talk to us about them!And in the meanwhile, enjoy the conference! Once again, I am thrilled to welcome you to Penn State.

Warmest regards,

Dr. Susan Welch
Dean, College of Liberal Arts
Penn State University

 

From the Conference Manager

Welcome to "Sustainable Asia: Challenges and Opportunities," the 2010 conference of MAR/AAS! The conference would not have been possible without the support of many colleagues and students at Penn State and beyond--particularly the MARAAS and AAS. The Association for Asian Studies is extremely generous in supporting the Teaching Asia Workshop, and we are pleased that we are able to continue this outreach activity.

We thank all the presenters for their contributions, including those who travelled especially to Penn State to lead workshops: Michael Gould, Chieko and Kodi Iwazaki, Nick Kaldis, and Shu-ming Tung. We are very fortunate to be able to host a concert by Michael Gould, and Chieko and Kodi Iwazaki, along with a special exhibition of Japanese woodblock prints in the Palmer Museum of Art. These events are designed to enrich your conference experience.

Once again, welcome to Penn State! Enjoy the conference!

Sincerely,

Alexander Huang
Associate Professor
Penn State University

 

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The Asian Studies Program
102 Old Botany Building| University Park, PA 16802
ph: 814.867.3260 | fax: 814.863.3528 | email: asianstudies@psu.edu